Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length



News: In the dread tribunal of last resort valor contended against valor. Brave men struggled & died for the right as God gave them to see the right - A. Stevenson

Author Topic: Copper Ball  (Read 1029 times)

Woodenhead

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 147
    • Email
Re: Copper Ball
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2019, 01:26:23 PM »
No copper-covered cannon balls, but plenty of copper (and white metal) coated rifle shot. All big 24, 32 and 42 pounder. Its described clearly in the invoices I posted previously. Highlights are shown below on the first page. There is a lot of great information about other CS projectiles made by Quinby & Robinson at the same time. They are worth examining closely. There was no regulation CS Rifle projectile until the Mullane was formally adopted for all calibers in Feb. 1862.

The second illustration below is from my last full-length book: Gettysburg Battlefield Relics & Souvenirs (2008). The 12pdr. solid shot is green - made of copper/bronze or brass. It was found with 3 iron solid shots under Hoffman's barn on the East Cavalry field at Gettysburg. I was a friend of Dan Hoffman, owner of the Rummel Farm across the street, still standing after more than 150 years. His brother's barn where these were found was built after the war on the main CS artillery position during the battle. I assume the Rebs buried them before they left. I believe it began as a Mexican projectile. I have photo'ed bronze/copper/brass grape shot dug in the Texas - Mexico theater.

Woodenhead

speedenforcer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 791
    • Raulerson Relics
Re: Copper Ball
« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2019, 05:04:34 PM »
Oh ok. I have your book. Didn't realize who woodenhead was until now. you have some excellent reference books.
It's not always "Survival of the fitest" sometimes the idiots get through.

Selma Hunter

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 346
Re: Copper Ball
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2019, 06:28:20 AM »
All,

It is worth noting that Quinby & Robinson relocated to the vicinity of Columbus, MS after the yankees moved closer to Memphis.  At Columbus Q&R continued to supply CS needs as far south as Mobile and throughout MS until the Briarfield Arsenal was relocated to Selma in (as I recall) 1863 - again due to the threat posed by union forces.  I am reasonably sure that the owners of Q&R were acquainted with Capt. Wm. R. Hunt while both were in Memphis prior to the relocation of the Briarfield Arsenal operation from Memphis to Columbus (thence, eventually, to Selma and Columbiana AL.

Jack Bell usually prevails in our debates on the details of the big guns but I think that the bronze shot on the Monitor when she arrived at Hampton Roads were actually solid bronze - not merely plated.  Dahlgren had forbidden their use out of a concern that the guns would not stand the pressures resulting from deployment of the heavier projectiles. Dahlgren was ever mindful of the failure of one of the guns on the USS Princeton on 28 February 1844 and the harm to John Ericssonís reputation which followed Ericsson right up to the earliest years of the war. 
Jack, check this one out and correct me if Iím wrong.

speedenforcer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 791
    • Raulerson Relics
Re: Copper Ball
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2019, 10:08:37 AM »
Good info.
It's not always "Survival of the fitest" sometimes the idiots get through.