Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length



News: Here, in the dread tribunal of last resort, valor contended against valor. Here brave men struggled & died for the right as God gave them to see the right. - Adlai Stevenson

Author Topic: Letters on Projectiles  (Read 1375 times)

misipirelichtr

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
    • Email
Re: Letters on Projectiles
« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2018, 07:35:08 PM »
From the photo, it sure looks like someone stamped it well after the war had ended.  But I'm thinking since you and Mr. George found it of interest, that's not the case.

CarlS

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1891
    • Email
Re: Letters on Projectiles
« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2018, 11:42:27 PM »
Had you not mentioned it being a 10-lber I would have thought from the profile that it was one of the baby Reads from South Carolina.
Best,
Carl

Woodenhead

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 105
    • Email
Re: Letters on Projectiles
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2018, 09:02:45 AM »
Maybe it was from SC. Pete asked me to shoot it years ago and my memory is not so good. We know very little about the CS shells and makers from the last year of the war. The copper sabot means it was not made in Richmond. Absence of a lathe dimple might date it from the first year of the war. I assume the letters were stamped when it was made but I don't know for certain. I was hoping some of the guys were familiar with this unusual marked shell or others like it.
Woodenhead

Jack Bell

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 44
    • Email
Re: Letters on Projectiles
« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2018, 04:20:48 PM »
To add another letter, this one a Union marking, it's "JY" on an 11-inch shell also marked with a "BY."

Woodenhead

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 105
    • Email
Re: Letters on Projectiles
« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2018, 01:55:26 PM »
This topic is just too good to let it die! How about the prominent "L" seen stamped into a number of 3 inch Broun sabots. I photo'ed this example at Pete's during the 1980s. He had additional similarly marked shells. I strongly suspect it represented the maker Lenher & White whose invoices confirm the production of about 1,500 3 inch Rifle shells between January and May of 1864. This small Richmond foundry finished many of the six and 12 pounders cast by other foundries like Adolphus Rham whose invoices were frequently marked "unfinished" when the projectiles were turned over to the Richmond Arsenal. The Rich. Arsenal subcontracted the finishing to Lenher & White and supplied them with Bormann underplugs to fill the side-loading holes. When the Arsenal ran out of the obsolete underplugs, Lenher & WHITE began making their own small brass side plugs (with two spanner holes) like those dug around Petersburg and shown in Pete's book. So. add the "L" to your list.

Woodenhead

emike123

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2048
    • Bullet and Shell
    • Email
War is L
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2018, 03:17:37 PM »
Thanks for this great info

divedigger

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 430
    • Email
Re: Letters on Projectiles
« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2018, 09:17:41 PM »
I have found a small number of 10" Columbiad shells with the letter T stamp. Any ideas?

CarlS

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1891
    • Email
Re: Letters on Projectiles
« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2018, 11:56:23 PM »
Is Tredegar too obvious? 

It is interesting the variety of stamps you've found there.  Haven't there been T, D, S, and star stamped found?  Am I missing anything?
Best,
Carl

divedigger

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 430
    • Email
Re: Letters on Projectiles
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2018, 07:01:22 AM »
T. D and star but no S on the 10" balls Carl